EDMUND’S COMMUNITY COURIER WINTER/SPRING 2014

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Chandler research marches on as usual and as usual instead of taking a straight line into the current topic, this time the Revolutionary War (although I did get there!), the path led to assisting in further research into Joseph’s will and his son Edmund’s inventory (half of our group descends from Joseph), the hunt for Edmund’s origins through DNA testing, breaking down more brick walls and making new discoveries, and more which are all featured in this issue.

Our Revolutionary War series continues with Part 2, “The Stirrings of Revolution: the Committees of Correspondence and Safety” of which two of our Chandlers were members. They were brothers Perez Chandler of Duxbury, who we will feature this issue, and Peleg Chandler of New Gloucester, Maine, who we will feature next issue.

I am working on a “Revolutionary War Timeline” which, as research progresses, I hope to add the various Chandler Revolutionary War veterans and Patriots to their place in the Timeline. At end of the series I hope to post the Timeline.

Next issue, in addition to Peleg Chandler, we hope to move on to military or Patriotic service by other Edmund descendants. Benjamin Chandler descendants have not been forgotten as we plan to feature Capt. Jonathan Chandler of the Battle of Bennington and some of the New Hampshire Chandlers in future issues. Judah Chandler will reappear as well as he participated in the capture of the British ship Margaretta in the Battle of Machias.

Also, Billie’s story of “The War of Richard Jenkins’ Ear” will be featured. Yes, this was a real war, ill-fated and ill advised, which Nathaniel Chandler was caught up in.

index1A reminder to those who are members of the ECFA, renewal notices have gone out. Dues go to maintaining the website, DNA research, and hopefully soon to re-vamp and update the website. Our member, Dick, is pushing DNA research into England and we want to be ready to provide funds for tests or upgrades if need be.

HELP NEEDED

indexIf any of you have any tech skills such as knowledge about web sites or Rootsmagic that would also help. A lot!

Lastly, if any of you have pictures, stories, small or big, involving Chandlers please send them to me or to Barb for the Courier.

DNA NEWS

The search continues for DNA matches with the Edmund Chandler family in England. Currently we are waiting for test results for a Chandler testee from Essex, England whose lineage traces back to William Candler who was born in the 1700s. It was also a hot bed of religious dissent during Edmund’s time and Edmund was a dissenter which is why he left England. While a match wouldn’t necessarily tell us who Edmund descended from it would give us the likely place that he came from.

We struck out with a testee from Buckinghamshire, England, but we are not giving up on Buckinghamshire yet as that one testee may not be representative of all of the Chandlers in that area.

We found out about Buckinghamshire Chandlers from Orland Chandler, who has just rejoined our group. Buckinghamshire first interested Orland as a possibility for Edmund’s origins as the Chandlers who lived there were blacksmiths and a few years later they became famous for their bell making foundry. Those bells still ring today. There were also at least two Edmund Chandlers from the same era as our Edmund and there were also religious dissenters in the area so you can see why the Edmund Chandler research radar went on high alert.

As Dick wrote, this kind of research is a roller-coaster ride as we have had hopes raised and dashed in the past. If the Essex testee’s comes back as promising, the ECFA will pay for the upgrade if need be.

The video above shows the  raising the 2nd bell at Mentmore so that it can be rung for full circle change-ringing. This ring of 5 bells was cast by Chandler of Drayton Parslow in 1668 and installed in the timber frame which was made at the same time. The bells have never been removed from the tower or re-tuned, so sound as they did when they were first installed.

Monastic building at Coggeshall abbey.

Monastic building at Coggeshall abbey.

Coggeshall – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The town where William Candler came from in Essex, England

 ECFA NEWS

Books by Our Members

The Genealogy and Real Estate of Joseph Chandler, Sr. of Duxbury, Massachusetts”

Our member, Billie, is still revising and expanding her book “The Genealogy and Real Estate of Joseph Chandler, Sr. of Duxbury, Massachusetts: With Proof of the Identity of his Grandson Capt. John Chandler.” She is adding new maps and adding more information about Joseph’s family. When it is finished a copy will be posted in our Members’ Only section.

Since the last issue, I assisted Billie with research into Plymouth Colonial law and dissecting Joseph’s will and son Edmund’s inventory. We have a copy of both Joseph’s will and Edmund’s inventory in the “Genealogy of Edward Small” in our Members’ Only library. She traced the real estate after identifying it by searching over 400 deeds, but there were still points in Joseph’s will and Edmund’s inventory that remained confusing especially dealing with the houses. There were issues involving Joseph and Edmund that were intertwined which made research complicated. There were also land transactions outside of the will and inventory which Billie has traced and which are now more fully explained and will be added as a chapter in the book. Billie’s work involved finding out who owned the land, and who had life estates, and who ended up with the land, and what Edmund’s assets and debts truly were.

This research, added with Billie’ prior monumental tracing of the land further supports that Capt. John was the son of Edmund and Elizabeth (Alden) Chandler.

 “The Immigrant,”

Our member, Al, is also in the process of editing his historical novel, “The Immigrant,” which is scheduled to be published this year. This book does not involve a Chandler, but his ancestor, John Law, who was taken prisoner at the battle of Dunbar, Scotland and endured a death march to Durham Cathedral and then expelled from the country. He was shipped, along with many other Scottish prisoners, to Boston. England dealt with the rebellious Scots by shipping them to New England, so if you have an early Maine ancestor of Scottish descent that is how he may have gotten here as that is where they ended up.

There is a sort-of Chandler connection in that the ship John Law was transported was named the Unity. Over a hundred years later there was another ship, also named “Unity”, which was involved in the capture of the British ship, Margaretta, at the beginning of the Revolutionary War. Judah Chandler was a Patriot involved in the capture of the Margaretta.

 New Members

This time we have a returning member and a new member.

We welcome back Orland Chandler who is back in full swing with Chandler research. In addition to his Buckinghamshire research, he was the one who discovered that Edmund, the immigrant had, a son named John, who died on the way to the Barbados. This discovery has been attributed others, but it came originally from Orland. Orland has a double connection to Edmund. Orland descends from both Capt. John Chandler and Nathaniel Chandler. Orland’s Capt. John line starting with Orland is:

Orland Chandler>Archie Donald Chandler>Hamer Lorenzo Chandler>Samuel Poole Chandler, Jr.>Rev. Samuel Poole>John Chandler, Jr.>Jonathan Chandler>Capt. John Chandler>Edmund Chandler>Joseph Chandler>Edmund Chandler, the immigrant.

His Nathaniel Chandler line is the same until we get to John Chandler, Jr. John Chandler, Jr. married his third cousin Mercy Sprague. Starting with that Mercy it is:

Mercy Sprague>Mercy (Chandler) Sprague>Nathaniel Chandler>Edmund Chandler>Joseph Chandler>Edmund Chandler, the immigrant.

Orland is not the only one with a double Chandler connection. I descend from both Edmund and Roger (who may be related to Edmund) and our member Cynthia, descends from Edmund and a Southern Chandler. Figuring that out took a lot of research!

We also welcome, new member, another Barbara Chandler. This Barbara is from Kingston, Mass, a neighbor of Duxbury. Her husband has deep Chandler roots in Duxbury and was the fire chief there. Her late father-in-law, Raymond P. Chandler, was a selectman and an athletic field is named after him. We hope to get picture of the field.

Her husband’s line is starting with his father is:

Raymond P. Chandler>Parker B. Chandler>Alden Chandler>Isaac Chandler>Ephraim Chandler>Nathaniel Chandler>Philip Chandler>Joseph Chandler>Joseph Chandler>Edmund Chandler, the immigrant.

 THE PLAQUE

No, it hasn’t been forgotten and we are still ready and willing to go forward with it. Unfortunately, there has been foot dragging by the town and the fellow in Duxbury who was enthusiastic about the Chandler research died. As I wrote previously, the Chandlers were a major family in the development of the town. Joseph Chandler originally owned what became the heart of the town –cemetery, church, town government buildings and more. There is still the Chandlerville area, a Chandler elementary school, Chandler Street and the aforementioned athletic field.

The good news is that our new member, Barbara, lives nearby and hopefully will be able to assist Billie in getting the plaque approved and placed.

 THE CHANDLER FAMILY ASSOCIATION

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As many of you are aware of, the CFA is our sister group. They now include not only Chandlers who descended from John Chandler of 1610 Jamestown, Virginia, but all Chandlers other than those who descend from Edmund. We would like to explore further contact and relationships with the CFA as it could help streamline Chandler research. We will keep our ECFA members posted on what we find out and will have discussions with our members in the future on how we should proceed.

 THE WEB SITE

web-designI have been trying to get a web site guru lined up amidst all of the other Chandler projects since last year. I did find someone, but have not yet heard back. If that does not work out, I will have to find someone else. Our web site does need updating and I am trying to find someone to re-vamp and it and make it easy to add updates.

 RESEARCH TIPS

NEW NAME OR ORIGINAL PLACE NAME?

One of the dilemmas that genealogists face is how to fill in birth and marriage places, etc. when the name of the place changed. The genealogy standard is to list it by the name that was used at the time. However, this can be confusing for non-genealogy relatives or even fellow genealogists if they are not familiar with the history of the area. That is how you may find your ancestor lived in maybe two different states and perhaps several different counties and towns, but never moved.

What seems like a more sensible approach is to list both the name of the place at the time the event occurred and the present name. That approach would seem to eliminate a lot of confusion.

The article “A Proposed Standard for Names, Dates and Places in a Genealogical Database” by Gary Mokotoff is an excellent discussion of the issue. Unfortunately, the article has disappeared from its former internet home, but as it is popular in genealogy circles you may be able to find it somewhere on the net.

 

POUNDS, PENCES, HALF PENNIES

  proofset

Generally speaking, understanding the old British monetary system, which began after the Norman Conquest in 1026 when the pound was divided into twenty shillings, is not a concern. The system was used until 1971.

However, you may be faced with it, if you have to figure out a will or estate inventory as Billie and I did when working on the Joseph Chandler project. Pounds, shillings, pences, guineas, farthings, etc. are all in oddball amounts which make for fun figuring for math lovers and hair pulling for the math impaired. Here is the link that explains the old British system:

Understanding old British money – pounds, shillings and pence

WHAT’S NEW AT FAMILYSEARCH

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They are continuing to add new vital records and features, so check back periodically. They also have much more research material online and news updates. More and more books have been digitized and some will eventually be posted online.

More genealogy programs including Rootsmagic and Legacy can now be directly linked to the Familysearch web site making the transfer of information direct. You can check to see if your program will link with them.

They also have a toll free help line. For this issue, I fruitlessly looked for a family tree. I gave up and called them. They have assistants located at their home computers waiting to help people. After no wait! I was connected to a fellow in British Columbia, Canada.

I was told that it turns out that they have their old family trees (you remember those error ridden things) archived in one section. If you want to see the new interactive and correctable ones they are in a separate section. You have to sign up to see this section. It is free and nobody bothers you once you sign up. You can also keep a Source Box at Familysearch to place your Familysearch “finds” from vital records, censuses and the like.

I didn’t bother to sign in which is why I couldn’t find that elusive family tree, but the help line assistant guided me right back to it.

Other free services can be found at the Family History Centers which are located worldwide. You can access Ancestry.com, Heritage Quest and Find My Past (UK) FREE on their computers. Check their web site www.familysearch.org to find a location near you.

From home and for free, you can access their “Wiki. They are like Wikipedia and some are terrific and some are not and not every place or topic has a Wiki yet. The maps are helpful. Here are a couple of samples.

Grafton County, New Hampshire | Learn | FamilySearch.org

Danville, Maine | Learn | FamilySearch.org

TV NEWS

PLYMOUTH

The TV mini-series, tentatively titled “Plymouth” is still a go with NBC. It will be produced by Mark Burnett, of “Survivor” and “The Bible” fame. It will cover the voyage of the Mayflower and the settling of Plymouth Colony. It is still in development and is not yet in production (I got that from Mark Burnett Productions). TV and film production are perilous voyages themselves with many projects being sunk along the way, but things are looking good right now for “Plymouth.” I will keep you posted. Edmund didn’t arrive until c. 1630 so probably a little late to include him, but if the production covers a lengthy period of the Plymouth Colony, and if we are lucky, he may be included as he was appointed Constable in 1636/37.

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE?

wdytya-aus

The TLC cable network has renewed this genealogy series and has ordered 10 new episodes for 2014. This is the show that traces the family trees of celebrities. They do show the actual places where their celebrity guests’ ancestors are from and you do get a glimpse of the places, libraries and courthouses where the historical papers are trotted out to view, although we don’t get to see the multitude of researchers toiling away in the archives or slogging through graveyards. Air dates for 2014 have not yet been announced.

THE STIRRINGS OF REVOLUTION

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The Committees of Correspondence and Safety

The beginning of the Revolutionary War era began in 1763 after the French and Indian War. This war ended the French threat to the American Colonies, but the war’s expense and the expectation of future defense expenses caused the British to decide that the American colonists should pay more taxes.

The series of taxes the British imposed plus other laws exerting British control of the colonies caused rising protest and anger amongst the colonists. The colonists felt that they were being denied their rights as Englishmen hence the rallying cry” “No taxation without representation!”

This taxation and trampling of rights by the British caused Samuel Adams, in 1772, to persuade the Boston town meeting to form a Committee of Correspondence which prepared and sent a statement of rights and grievances to the other towns. Committees had been formed previously, but only temporarily and only for grievances about a specific issue. The idea of such a Committee spread throughout the colonies and soon most towns had a permanent Committee of Correspondence to keep in touch with other towns over grievances with the British and later to serve as a shadow government opposing the British.

 Two of our Chandlers, brothers Perez Chandler of Duxbury, Massachusetts and Peleg Chandler of New Gloucester, then Massachusetts and now Maine, were appointed to serve on their local Committees of Correspondence and later Safety. Town records have not been researched to find out what specific actions they took, but we do know in general how the Committees of Correspondence and Safety functioned. Later as war broke out they became known as Committees of Safety. The Committees of Safety functioned as local governments and had the power to call out the local minutemen and muster the militia when needed and punish those who did not respond.

In the early days of the Revolutionary period the first job of the Committees was to disseminate information to the local townspeople as Samuel Adams and others felt it was imperative to have an informed citizenry. News was spread to the farthest edges of the colonies by ships and couriers on horseback in handwritten letters and printed pamphlets. Many the Committee members were also members of colonial legislative assemblies and many were active in the secret Sons of Liberty.

samuel adamsThe Committees became the leaders of the American resistance to British actions at first in opposing and protesting British taxes and policies and later the Committees led the war effort on both a state and local level. It was the colonial and local Committees who took charge in reviewing merchant records looking for those who tried to defy the boycott, declared by Congress, of imported British goods and then they published the names of said merchants. They encouraged the colonists to buy American and avoid luxuries from England. The Boston Tea Party and other “Tea Parties” such as the one in Marshfield which adjoined Duxbury were instigated by the Committees of Correspondence and Safety.

Strident objections and warnings about British rule proliferated. In 1775 New Hampshire’s residents were warned by the Provincial Congress that “Tyranny already begins to waive its banners in your borders, and to threaten these once happy regions with infamous and destestable slavery.”

The Committees became a shadow government organized by Patriot leaders operating under nose of England and ultimately the First Continental Congress emerged from them. About 7,000 to 8,000 men Patriots served on these Committees. Loyalists were excluded. They set up espionage networks to ferret out those who were disloyal to the cause and they displaced Royal officials which led to the toppling of the entire Royal government in each of the colonies. By the end of 1774 and early 1775, the Committees supervised elections of provincial conventions which took over the operation of the colonial government. Once war broke out, it was the Committees who supervised the local militia’s response to the British threat.

The Committees became the brains and structure behind the Revolution and without them, instead of a Revolution, there would only have been separate and uncoordinated protests and uprisings which would have undoubtedly been quashed by the British.

From the shadow governments of the Committees came the beginnings of what was to become the government of the United States.

SOURCES AND ITEMS OF INTEREST:

Coming of the American Revolution: The Committees of Correspondence

Committee of correspondence – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

SparkNotes: Samuel Adams: Section 8: Committee of Correspondence

Committees of Correspondence | American Revolution | 1773 | Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum

Committee of Safety: Definition from Answers.com

http://www.committee.org/PCOS11Massachusetts.htm Information on the Committees of Safety

http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/makingrev/crisis/text6/bostonpamphlet.pdf The Boston Pamphlet produced by the Boston Committee of Correspondence

Samuel Adams – American Revolution – HISTORY.com A very nice reenactment video of the Sons of Liberty and the founding of the Committees of Correspondence

PEREZ CHANDLER

Philip>Joseph>Joseph>Edmund, the immigrant

July 10, 1730-Jan. 28, 1800

L33PerezChandler

Perez Chandler supported the Revolutionary cause by serving on the Duxbury Committee of Correspondence and Safety. He was selected on March 17, 1777. That might sound a quill pen pushing job, safely tucked away in a Meeting House, but it was a job that involved both risk and intelligence. The Committees of Correspondence and Safety, were the brains of the Revolutionary War effort, communicating and coordinating with other towns at with at first protests then later war planning and strategy. The Revolution never would have succeeded without that “shadow government” network.

As leaders they would have been the first ones to be sought by the British and probably the first to have been charged with treason and maybe hanged if the war had been won by the British.

Perez was 47 years old when he was appointed to the Committee. He may not have participated as a soldier in the Revolution, but he was a soldier when he was younger during the French and Indian Wars. Those wars were expensive and which was one of the causes of the British trying to extract more taxes out of the colonists which in turn led to the cry of “No taxation without representation” which in turn acted one of the catalysts for the Revolution.

The Duxbury town records may have a record of exactly what Perez did, but it is also possible that records were not kept or were destroyed lest fall into the hands of the British. The records would have to be searched to find out. We do know in general what the Committees did (see accompanying story).

We do know that there was a Liberty Pole in Duxbury, which was the site of protests against the British and there was a “Tea Party” in neighboring Marshfield, the most Tory town in New England, which may have involved the Committee that Perez served on. To read about the Liberty Pole, go to our back issues of the Courier on our web site.

The name Perez seems like an unusual name for a Revolutionary War New Englander as it sounds Spanish. However, Perez, like most of the forenames used in the Plymouth Colony, which included Duxbury, came from the Bible and not even England much less Spain.

According to the online, “Baby Name Wizard,” Perez, also spelled Pharez or Peretz, was the son of Judah and Tamar and means “burst forth” or “breakthrough.”

The Spanish name Perez is related to the Greek word for rock which puts it in the same group as Peter, Pierre, Petra and Pedro.

Perez was not the only Perez in Duxbury as he had a son and a grandson named Perez Chandler and there were others who were not Chandlers whose forenames were also Perez.

Perez was the son of Philip Chandler and Rebecca Phillips. Philip was unique in that he was the only son of Joseph and Martha (Hunt) Chandler to remain in Duxbury. Joseph moved to North Yarmouth, Maine (then still part of Massachusetts) in 1727 with the rest of his family following him a couple of years later. Joseph was a prosperous blacksmith like his father, Joseph, Sr. It may have been the need for land for his many sons that inspired him to leave Duxbury for the then wilderness of Maine to start anew.

Joseph sold his home and land to eldest son, Philip who remained in Duxbury although at one time Philip may also have seriously considered moving to North Yarmouth as he owned land there. Philip’s son, Peleg (to be featured next issue) and daughter Elizabeth, also moved to Maine. The rest of Philip’s children, including Perez, remained in Duxbury or nearby Kingston.

According to Duxbury vital records, Perez married Rhoda Wadsworth Dec. 24, 1793. Most of their children also stayed in Duxbury with the exception of sons Benjamin and Seth B. who moved to Maine where they practiced medicine.

There is a small hand-crafted notebook, which includes genealogy, created by Asenath Chandler, Perez’ daughter, at the Duxbury Rural Historical Society Library located in Duxbury, Massachusetts. Also in the collection are receipts, copies of deeds, etc. To see the list click on the source link below.

SOURCES;

Chandler Collections | Drew Archival Library

Located in the Duxbury Rural Historical Society in Duxbury, Massachusetts

www.edmundchandler.com Picture of Perez’ gravestone from Members’ Only section and family genealogy and information

 

THOSE BRICK WALLS COME TUMBLIN’ DOWN

By

Carol May

broken-brick-wall

Since the last Courier, several brick walls of many years standing came down. The first was Charles Chandler, then my Rebecca Chandler, another Rebecca Chandler and two Charlotte Chandlers!

Charles Chandler

Charles>Abner, Jr.>Abner>Joseph>Benjamin>Edmund, the immigrant.

One of the earliest members of our group, you may remember her as East Coast Barbara, (there have been three Barbara Chandlers in our group!) was stuck with only a hunch and a few clues that her Charles Chandler descended from Edmund. Finally, due to both new records added to www.familysearch.org and DNA testing she was able to confirm the connection. Here is Charles Chandler’s line starting with Charles: Charles>Abner, Jr.>Abner>Joseph>Benjamin>Edmund, the immigrant. Charles was born in Piermont, New Hampshire, home of many of the Benjamin Chandler line.

The Rebecca Chandlers

The second wall to come down was my own. I learned over the years that there were FOUR Rebecca Chandlers of Minot/Poland, Maine. Our member, Elsie, and I had identified two of them as the daughters of brothers Nathaniel and John Chandler (>Jonathan>Capt. John>Edmund>Joseph>Edmund, the immigrant), but I was left with a parentless Rebecca Chandler and a brick wall.

Then I figured out that there was probably a third Rebecca Chandler who was the daughter of Abel and Sarah (Weston) Chandler of Duxbury, then of New Hampshire and finally, Minot, Maine (There were four Abel Chandlers, but that is another story).

Circumstantial evidence began mounting up, naming patterns, tally marks in the censuses for a girl her age, marriage in Minot, home of Abel’s family, the family ties between Rebecca and Marcellus Augustus Weston Chandler, a proven grandson of Abel Chandler, all pointed to Rebecca being Abel’s daughter and Marcellus’ aunt.

Both Rebecca and Marcellus moved to Brunswick, Maine. Rebecca’s son, Abiezer, and Marcellus married sisters. Abiezer named his daughter Ellen Weston Snow and his son Marcellus. Both Marcellus and Abiezer were buried in the same cemetery. With all of this circumstantial evidence, I thought that I had at last found my Rebecca Chandler’s family.

As I mentioned in a previous issue, I had stumbled upon a since defunct web site which included a snippet of information that said that Rebecca Chandler was the daughter of Jonathan Chandler and that she had died in Brunswick. There was no direct source information other than it, and all of the other “info bits” on the site, was taken from a variety of old sources.

My Rebecca died in Brunswick, Maine, but I first dismissed Jonathan as her father as an error as I thought all of the Jonathan Chandlers in the Minot/Poland area had been accounted for.

Then uh oh! I had come across and was working on the “other” Jonathan Chandler family, when it occurred to me that this Jonathan could be the father of my Rebecca Chandler.

Neither Abel nor Jonathan’s children could be found in birth records and the censuses consisted of only tally marks and my Rebecca fit into the censuses for both of them. Both families had to be reconstructed circumstantially. The information was also conflicting. In the1880 census Abiezer’s mother’s birthplace was listed as Maine, not Massachusetts where Abel’s family was originally from. The marriage records for my Rebecca and Jonathan Snow said that she was a resident of Minot, Maine where Abel and family moved to and not Poland where Jonathan and family moved to.

Now I was sitting on top of my brick wall with two alternatives — Rebecca, daughter of Abel or Rebecca, daughter of Jonathan with circumstantial evidence for both sides.

Our member, Steve, had taken pictures of the Empire Cemetery in Poland, Maine. Buried there were, I believe, were several of Jonathan Chandler’s children. In the same plot and row there was Jonathan Chandler, Jr. and his wife Cynthia (Lane) Chandler and Jonathan and Rebecca Lane. Jonathan Chandler Jr. married Cynthia Lane, sister of Jonathan Lane, so it seemed quite possible that Rebecca Lane could have been the sister of Jonathan Chandler, Jr. In those days it was quite common for brothers to marry sisters from another family. If this were true this Rebecca would be Rebecca #4!

By now I also had a flimsy clue from a family tree full of mistakes that indicated that she could be a Chandler but even the creator of the tree was iffy about it. If Rebecca Lane was indeed Rebecca Chandler #4 then by default, Rebecca Chandler #3 was my Rebecca and the daughter of Abel and Sarah (Weston) Chandler.

Our member and uber researcher, Billie, offered to help. I explained that the tie breaker lay with being able to figure out if the mysterious Rebecca Lane’s maiden name was Chandler.

Almost simultaneously, both Billie and I, giving it one last shot, came across separate vital records that proved that this Rebecca Chandler was indeed the wife of Jonathan Lane and therefore, not my Rebecca who married Jonathan Snow. Death records for two of Jonathan and Rebecca Lane’s children, John C. and Eliza, both gave Jonathan Lane and Rebecca Chandler as their parents and as a bonus I even got the place of Rebecca’s birth on one of the records — North Yarmouth, Maine, original home of Jonathan Chandler and his family.

So by default, and with circumstantial evidence and after an exhaustive search of the Minot/Poland Maine Chandlers, I believe that my Rebecca Chandler was the daughter of Abel and Sarah (Weston) Chandler. Again, please note that the evidence is still circumstantial. Her line is below:

Rebecca Chandler #3

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Rebecca Snow (1787-1844)

Rebecca>Abel*>John>Joseph>Benjamin>Edmund, the immigrant.

Maine Genealogy Archives: Marriage Records of Rev. Jonathan Scott of Poland and Minot, 1796-1819

And here is the line for the Rebecca Chandler, daughter of Jonathan Chandler of North Yarmouth, who later moved to Poland, Maine, starting with Rebecca:

Rebecca Chandler #4

rebecca lane

Rebecca Lane (1795-1847)

Rebecca>Jonathan*>Judah>Joseph>Joseph> Edmund, the immigrant.

Person Details for Jonithen Lane in entry for Eliza A Raynard, “Maine, Vital Records, 1670-1907 ” — FamilySearch.org

“Maine, Vital Records, 1670-1907 ,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KCDX-GVH : accessed 09 Mar 2014), Jonithen Lane in entry for Eliza A Raynard, 1903.

Person Details for Jonathan Lane in entry for John C Lane, “Maine, Vital Records, 1670-1907 ” — FamilySearch.org

“Maine, Vital Records, 1670-1907 ,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VZQP-Z4Q : accessed 09 Mar 2014), Jonathan Lane in entry for John C Lane, 1893.

 The Three Charlotte Chandlers

While researching, Rebecca (Chandler) Lane, I revisited the Charlotte Chandler mystery as it appears circumstantially that Rebecca #4 and a Charlotte Chandler were sisters. It also appears that the family trees on Familysearch mistakenly list some of Rebecca (Chandler) Lane’s children as Charlotte’s children. The information was very garbled, but it appears that some of it may have come from original sources.

Not only are the children mixed up, the three Charlotte Chandlers of Maine in those Familysearch family trees are also mixed up. The three Charlottes were all born within a year or two of each other. One is documented as an Edmund descendant and one is probably an Edmund descendant and the third does not descend from Edmund, but is documented as a descendant of William and Annis. I think that I have untangled them.

Charlotte Chandler #1

Charlotte>Jonathan>Judah>Joseph>Joseph>Edmund, the immigrant

It appears that there was a Charlotte, probably Chandler, who married Simeon Lane in Maine. We know that this Charlotte Chandler was not Joel Chandler’s daughter, as many family trees assert, because we have Joel’s daughter well documented as to who she did marry.

It appears circumstantially that she was the daughter of Jonathan and Zeruiah (Brown) Chandler who is a documented descendant of Edmund Chandler, the immigrant.

I couldn’t find a marriage record for Charlotte and Simeon, it is probably lost or destroyed, but there a record for her second marriage to Thomas Briggs. According to Ancestry she died in 1882 and was buried in the Pine Grove Cemetery in Poland, Maine. However, as only part of that cemetery has been photographed I have not been able to find her grave.

Both Simeon Lane and Charlotte’s name appears on her children’s birth records in Poland, Maine. One of their children was named Seth Chandler Lane, another clue. She is also mentioned as Simeon’s wife in the “Annals of Oxford County.” See excerpt below:

Simeon Lane, innkeeper at Welchville, ae. 54, d. June 8,

1849. T^^ following year, the family consisted of Charlot-

te, ae. 48, Seth C. ae. 21, George E. ae. 18, Elizabeth

E. ae. 15, Sarah W. ae. 13, Melinda, ae. 10, Abby A.

ae. 7, and farmers, George W. Welch, ae. 25, and Nelson

Dennin, ae. 22. Mrs. Charlotte Lane and Thomas A.

Briggs of Otisfield, were m. Dec. 16, 1855.

 This Charlotte was closely associated with Poland, Maine where the Jonathan Chandler family lived and spent much of her life there. She was born c. 1801. The 1810 census shows a daughter age 10-16 which would have been one year off.

The 1820 census shows a daughter age 16 to 26 which is spot on. There were only two Chandler families in Poland, Maine during the 1820s. The other family was Alden Chandler and he and his children have been well documented and are of a later generation than Jonathan’s family.

The US 1830 census for Poland, Maine shows Simeon and presumably his wife, Charlotte, living in Poland and the 1840 census shows not only Simeon and family, but Jacob Chandler and Jonathan Chandler (Jr.) listed one after the other so they were most likely next door neighbors.

More research may further strengthen and hopefully, confirm the connection.

Full text of “Annals of Oxford, Maine, from its incorporation, February 27, 1829 to 1850. Prefaced by a brief account of the s

 Charlotte Chandler #2

Charlotte>Joel>Jonathan>Joseph>Joseph>Edmund, the immigrant

This Charlotte J. Chandler was born March 6, 1802 in Portland, Cumberland, Maine to Joel and Pamela (Lincoln) Chandler according to vital records. Joel is a documented descendant of Edmund Chandler, the immigrant. According to marriage records a Charlotte or a Charlotte J. or T. Chandler (depending on the transcription) married Capt. David Harwood and after he died she married his brother Otis Harwood. David and Otis were from adjacent Sagadahoc County. She did not marry Simeon Lane (see above) nor did she marry John Charles of Oxford County, Maine. Maine death records show a Charlotte Harwood dying in Portland, Maine on Nov. 3, 1885 who was about the right age. Another clue is that her middle initial given variously, probably due to transcribing errors, as I, J or T appears periodically in the records.

Person Details for Charlotte Chandler, “Maine, Births and Christenings, 1739-1900” — FamilySearch.org

“Maine, Births and Christenings, 1739-1900”, index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F492-3LH : accessed 10 Mar 2014), Charlotte Chandler, 06 Mar 1802.

Person Details for Charlotte Chandler, “Maine, Marriages, 1771-1907” — FamilySearch.org

“Maine, Marriages, 1771-1907”, index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F46B-1PL : accessed 10 Mar 2014), David Harwood and Charlotte Chandler, 23 Aug 1830.

Person Details for Charlotte J. Harwood, “Maine, Marriages, 1771-1907” — FamilySearch.org

“Maine, Marriages, 1771-1907”, index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F46Y-7Z8 : accessed 10 Mar 2014), Otis Harwood and Charlotte J. Harwood, 27 Sep 1832.

Person Details for Charlotte T. Harwood, “Maine, Deaths and Burials, 1841-1910” — FamilySearch.org

“Maine, Deaths and Burials, 1841-1910”, index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F48F-SPG : accessed 10 Mar 2014), Charlotte T. Harwood, 03 Nov 1883.

Charlotte Chandler #3

Charlotte>Timothy and on back to William and Annis

This Charlotte is not of the Edmund family, but appears that she is of the William and Annis Chandler family. She was born Nov. 22, 1801 in Pembroke, Merrimack, New Hampshire to Timothy and Phebe (Holt) Chandler. The family later moved to Lovell, Oxford County, Maine. This Charlotte Chandler, not Joel’s daughter, appears to have married John Charles January 17, 1824 in Lovell, Maine.

UPDATES

The “Other” Jonathan Chandler Family of Poland, Maine

Jonathan>Judah>Joseph>Joseph>Edmund, the immigrant

Figuring out the Rebecca and Charlotte Chandlers has necessitated an update of the “other” Jonathan Chandler family. If you recall, back in the Fall 2011 Courier we began a series doing a circumstantial reconstruction of the “other” Jonathan Chandler of Poland, Maine family. There with no birth records and only census tally marks for primary evidence and so came with the disclaimer that it was subject to change. There were also two “mystery” girls who we think have been finally identified.

This was the Jonathan moved from North Yarmouth, Maine to Poland Maine after the 1810 census and before the1820 census and not the Jonathan Chandler who married Rebecca Packard as he had died before North Yarmouth Jonathan moved to Poland, Maine. Both were descendants of Edmund, the immigrant

The “other” Jonathan family tree is still circumstantial so still subject to change, but is now on firmer ground. It is not Mayflower or DAR level of proof yet as we still lack many primary sources. As we are a research group, we find that posting circumstantial findings, and labeling them as such, can lead to descendants out there who can either add or in some cases, refute, the research.

A newspaper from 1826 reported that when Mrs. Jonathan Chandler died seven of her 11 children were still living. Assuming that was accurate, all seven have been found and with the addition of Rufus Chandler, who died a few months before his mother, which brings the total to 8. It appears also that a son died very young and two daughters died young which brings the total to 11.

We still don’t know where Jonathan and Zeruiah are buried, but Jonathan, Jr., Reuben, Rufus, Rachel, and Rebecca along with many of their family members were all buried in a group in the Empire Cemetery in Poland, Maine. The only other family in Poland, Maine during that later time frame was Alden Chandler’s family, and some of his children are also buried there, but are well documented.

In addition, the suffix, “Jr.” had come into modern usage to only denote a son as opposed being used for a younger person with the same name, related or not, which was how it was used in earlier times.

Also, Jonathan, Jr. kept the suffix “Jr.” until he died as it was on his gravestone which is also the modern usage. In previous times that suffix would have been dropped as soon as the older Jonathan Chandler died.

The circumstantial evidence for Jacob and Anna Chandler is not as strong. It was noted in their marriage records that they were originally from North Yarmouth and they did live in Poland and adjacent Danville (later part of Auburn, Maine). This was the Jonathan Chandler family’s home territory.

As for Charlotte, the circumstantial evidence for her is the thinnest. She also married a Lane, but it appears that he was maybe a distant cousin of the other Lanes. She lived in Poland, Maine and her son was named Seth Chandler Lane. She appears in family trees as Charlotte Chandler, but without substantiation. She should only be listed tentatively as the youngest daughter of Jonathan and Zeruiah Chandler as more research needs to be done.

The 1840 census for Poland, Maine shows Simeon Lane (presumably with wife Charlotte), Jacob Chandler and Jonathan Chandler (Jr.) all listed one after the other in the 1840 census so they were probably living next door to each other which bolsters the argument that they were related.

Here is the new lineup for the “other” Jonathan Chandler’s family with more birth dates added:

AN UPDATED RECONSTRUCTION OF THE “OTHER” JONATHAN CHANDLER FAMILY

Rachel Chandler born Feb. 1781 from grave stone and died Jan. 20, 1864. Empire Cemetery, Poland, Maine. Never married

Jacob Chandler born 1787, North Yarmouth (from Royal River Valley by David Colby Young). Died May 10, 1872 from Hotel Road Cemetery. Married Thankfull Higgins from vital records

Rufus Chandler born July 16, 1789 and died May 26, 1826 from grave stone, Empire Cemetery. Married Sarah Eaton Bradbury from vital records.

Anna Chandler born Jan. 20, 1792 (in North Yarmouth) and died June 7, 1880 from grave stone Oak Hill Cemetery, Auburn, Maine. Married Moses Bailey from vital records.

Reuben Chandler born April 1794 died 1852 from grave stone. Married Mary Parcher. From their children’s vital records.

Rebecca Chandler born April 1795 died Nov. 25, 1847 from grave stone Empire Cemetery. Married Jonathan R. Lane from grave stone and censuses.

Charlotte Chandler born c. 1801(from census) died after 1880. A Familysearch family tree has her buried in Pine Grove Cemetery in Poland, Maine. I have not been able to verify as this as not all of the graves have been photographed. She married first, Simeon Lane, and second, Thomas Briggs.

Jonathan Chandler, Jr. born 1803 died Dec. 13, 1840 from Empire Cemetery grave stone. Married Cynthia Lane. From censuses, children’s vital records and grave stone.

The Underground Railroad

by Barb Chandler

(Escaping slaves had to find their way north. Northern states such as New York and Massachusetts that had strong abolitionist societies and benevolent groups.People trying to escape slavery had many clues they could rely on to find out where “north” actually was. One of the best clues they could use to find north was to locate the North Star. The North Star is also called Polaris. Unlike other stars, it never changes position. It always points to the north. People have always used a group of stars to help them find the North Star. They have called this group of stars many names, depending on how they saw the “picture” created by the stars. Some people thought the group of stars looked like a dipper — with a cup that had a very long handle. Slaves knew this group of stars as the Drinking Gourd. They sometimes used hollowed-out gourds to dip and drink water. The gourds looked just like long-handled cups. Two stars on the cup’s edge always point to the North Star. By finding the “drinking gourd” in the sky, people traveling at night could always find the North Star. From: Pathways to Freedom Maryland and the Underground Railroad http://pathways.thinkport.org/secrets/gourd1.cfm)

 

I’ve been interested in the Civil Rights Movement for a long time so you can imagine my delight when I discovered my second great uncle was a conductor on the Underground Railroad. When I told Carol May his involvement she said that she had come across a Chandler who was an abolitionist. I don’t know whether she was in our line, but thought you would enjoy learning about this remarkable woman’s achievements.

elizabeth chandler

Elizabeth Chandler (1807-1834)

Elizabeth was born into a Quaker family in Centre (Wilmington) Delaware to Thomas Chandler (1773–1817) and Margaret Evans (1778–1808).

When she was 18 years old she wrote a poem titled the Slave-ship:

The Slave-ship was winding her course o’er the ocean,
The winds and the waters had sunk into rest;
All hush’d was the whirl of the tempest’s commotion,
That late had awaken’d the sailor’s devotion,
When terror had kindled remorse in his breast.

And onward she rode, though by curses attended,
Though heavy with guilt was the freight that she bore,
Though with shrieks of despair was the midnight air rended,
And ceaseless the groans of the wretches ascended,
That from friends and from country forever she tore.

On the deck, with his head on his fetter’d hand rested,
He who once was a chief and a warrior stood;
One moment he gain’d, by his foes unmolested,
To think o’er his woes, and the fate he detested,
Till madness was firing his brain and his blood.

“Oh, never!” he murmur’d in anguish, “no, never!
These limbs shall be bent to the menial’s toil!
They have reft us, my bride—but they shall not forever
Your chief from his home and his country dissever—
No! never will I be the conqueror’s spoil

“Say! long didst thou wait for my coming, my mother?
Did ye bend o’er the desert, my sister, your eye?
And weep at the lengthen’d delay of your brother,
As each slow passing moment was chased by another,
And still he appear’d not a tear-drop to dry.

“But ye shall—yes, again ye shall fondly embrace me!
We will meet my young bride in the land of the blest:
Death, death once again in my country shall place me,
One bound shall forever from fetters release me!”
He burst them, and sunk in the ocean’s dark breast.

After reading her poem Benjamin Lundy, a well known abolitionist and publisher, invited Chandler to write for his periodical, The Genius of Universal Emancipation. Chandler She wrote for and edited the “Ladies’ Repository” section of his newspaper. She used her appeal to women to demand better treatment for Native Americans  and the immediate emancipation of slaves.

Many of her articles were copied and circulated in the most popular newspapers of the time.  She also introduced one of the most famous abolitionist images, the kneeling female slave with the slogan “Am I not a Woman and a Sister.”

SlaveryIllustratedInItsEffectsUponWomanChandler used her articles and poems to participate in national discussions and debates about Abolitionism.

In 1830 she moved to Lenawee County, Michigan. She continued  writing articles as Editor of “The Ladies Repository” section in Lundy’s magazine. In 1832, she formed the Logan Female Anti-Slavery Society which eventually resulted in the establishment of one of the main links in the Underground Railroad system to Canada.

Sources:

Elizabeth Margaret Chandler, Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Margaret_Chandler

Elizabeth Chandler, The Michigan Women’s Historical Center and  Hall of Fame http://hall.michiganwomen.org/honoree.php?C=0&A=13~15~197~12

Until next time, happy hunting!

 

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