SUMMER 2015 EDMUND’S COMMUNITY COURIER

Summer greetings to all! I have been very busy these past months with both genealogy and non-genealogy business. Much has been going on behind the scenes both with our Edmund Chandler Chandler family chapter and at the CFA.

IMPORTANT NOTICE!

moving
The contents of our ECFA web site are in the process of moving to the Chandler Family Association Edmund Chandler Chapter as we merged with the CFA last year. The Edmund Chandler family was the 13th genetic Chandler family to be recognized, so we are Chapter 13. Our founder, James, and the CFA editor, Claudia, have been working hard making this happen. You can go to our ECFA web site, http://www.edmundchandler.com , where you will find a clickable link for our new CFA Edmund Chandler Chapter 13 site or you can go directly to our new site: Chandler Family Association – Genetic Chandler Family #13 – Descendants of Edmund Chandler born England 1588
With the exception of the Members’ Only section which will be moved in the near future, everything has been moved over to our new site. If you are a paid member and want to access the Members’ Only section and library, you can e-mail me, Carol, at docabye@aol.com for the new password.
Because of the difficulty, impossibility according to Claudia, of creating a Members’ Only section at the CFA web site, most of our library and other Members’ Only material will be available to everyone at our new site. Claudia is the editor of the CFA newsletter, information and computer wrangler. If you wish your Edmund Chandler lineage to be on the public lineage page, Chandler Family Association – Members’ Lineages , you can contact Claudia to have your lineage added to this page. Barb, our Edmund’s Community Courier editor, has already her lineage posted. The databases will be in the CFA library.
A big thank you to Claudia of the CFA and our ECFA, founder James for tackling the enormous project of moving our huge amount of records, maps, photos and information – about 1200 pages in the library alone. As the CFA is a big group (about 700 members worldwide), there are many hands to help with administrative chores so updates to the CFA web site will be frequent.

IN THIS ISSUE

*SEARCHING FOR EDMUND’S ORIGINS
*BILLIE’S BOOK ON JOSEPH CHANDLER AND SOME OF HIS DESCENDANTS
*O’NEIL FARM A 300 hundred-year-old farm owned only by Chandlers, Averys and O’Neils) will be a part of the 2020 quadricentennial celebrating the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. Your connection to the farm is either as a direct descendant of one of the Chandlers who owned the farm or as a many times removed great nephew or niece.
*JULIA F. CHANDLER BIBLE An 1887 Bible with births, marriages and deaths going back to the 1700s.
*IRVING W. AND WILLIAM (WELLER?!) L. CHANDLER A Chandler brick wall broken down. This one led back to William L. Chandler of Bartlett, New Hampshire
*DNA NEWS We have two new YDNA matches with the Edmund Chandler family. Also, a simple explanation of the several kinds of DNA tests and a simple explanation of how ethnic origins and cousin finding works and whether or not this may pencil out for you.
*SOME CFA NEWS Latest on the 25th anniversary and annual meeting, trip to England and more.
*TIPS AND USEFUL LINKS *COMING UP

SEARCHING FOR EDMUND’S ORIGINS

Where was Edmund from? That has been the really big question for years. Our member, Billie, has a hot lead. I am hoping that we can spend time researching that lead further.

BILLIE’S BOOK

Billie has finished writing her book on Joseph Chandler, his land, and some of his descendants. Joseph was Edmund Chandler, the immigrant’s son. The writing is done, next will be adding the maps, photos and illustrations. When that is done it will be published.

THE O’NEIL FARM:History – Historic O’Neil Farm

Avery / O'Neil dairy barn taken around 1890.

Avery / O’Neil dairy barn taken around 1890.

The O’Neil farm, with a rich and deep Chandler history, will represent Duxbury as part of the Plymouth quadricentennial which will be celebrated in 2020.
It is the last working dairy farm in Duxbury and is one of the last historic working farms on the South Shore of Massachusetts. Carl O’Neil, the support of the town of Duxbury, donors and The Wildlands Trust of Southeastern Massachusetts arranged to have the farm permanently preserved as a working farm several years ago. Carl O’Neil, a descendant of Edmund Chandler, the immigrant, still operates the farm.
Part of the farm was first purchased in 1715 by Samuel Chandler (Benjamin>Edmund, the immigrant) and his cousin, Joseph Chandler, (Joseph > Edmund, the immigrant.) Joseph married Martha Hunt and later moved to Maine selling his portion to his son, Philip. Only three families – the Chandlers, Averys and O’Neils have owned the farm over the last three centuries. Past owners of the various portions of the farm include Nathan Chandler, Ira Chandler, Nathaniel Lewis Chandler, Horatio Chandler as well as other Chandlers.

Chandler / Avery / O'Neil Homestead .

Chandler / Avery / O’Neil Homestead .

An Avery married a Chandler and an O’Neil married a Chandler further extending the Chandler connection to the farm. It was not a straight line inheritance by one branch of the Chandler family as the land that makes up the farm was bought, inherited, sold and bought again by various Chandlers.
To see pictures and to read more about the history of the farm, which includes more information about the Chandlers, click the link; http://www.historiconeilfarm.org/history.html

Horatio Chandler ( with oxen.

Horatio Chandler ( with oxen.

Today, the farm consists of 145 acres and 40 cows. You can participate in group tours, organized events such as Farm Day, or hike the one mile Chandler trail which includes wild lands. There are also programs for pre-school and school children.
If you have information or a story about the O’Neil Farm, they would appreciate hearing from you.

JULIA F. CHANDLER BIBLE

Lynn Holmes, from Virginia, recently gave a Bible with the inscription, “Julia F. Chandler from Mother, Dec.25th 1887” to the CFA.

It was not her Bible, but part of a collection of antiques owned by her antique store-owning grandparents. The query went out, “Who was Julia F. Chandler?” As the lady lived in Virginia, researching Chandlers from the south seemed the logical place to look first. I mistakenly thought that there was not much chance that they were Edmund Chandler descendants until I got the first real clue that Julia was from Freeport, Maine and that there was a Winslow in the family – lots of Winslows in New England.
When I began reading the names listed in the Bible, I said an out loud “Oh, my gosh!” as there were Chandler names that I recognized as being Edmund descendants. There was Julia’s uncle, Rufus Chandler, who died in Texas, another Rufus and others that we had in our database.
Julia’s mother, who gave her the Bible, was Almira (Webster) Chandler. Although it is very difficult to read it appears that Edward, Julia’s father, died at sea in 1857 the year that Julia was born. Edward does not appear in the 1860 US census which would lend credence to that being the correct date.
Julia’s lineage starting with Julia is: Julia F. Chandler> Edward Chandler+Almira Webster> Rufus Chandler+Abigail Dennison> Jonathan Chandler+Rachel Mitchell> Joseph Chandler+Martha Hunt> Joseph Chandler+Mercy?>Edmund Chandler, the immigrant,+?
The Bible lists Chandler marriages, births and deaths going back to her g-grandfather, Rufus Chandler (born in 1766), his wives Nancy Cushing and Abigail Dennison, and their children. There are also many Websters and some Waites. Claudia, the editor of the CFA newsletter, sent me copies of the pages which she enhanced for easier reading, although some of them are still extremely faded. I will transcribe them and hopefully we can post the transcriptions.
As the Bible was published in 1887 the names and dates were filled in most likely by Julia and she continued to add to it until the early 1900s. Groups like the Mayflower Society and DAR are picky about when Bibles were published as anything entered into a Bible before the date of publication was considered after the fact and not as good as information entered at the time of the event. Nonetheless, the entries in this Bible seem to be fairly accurate, either copied from another source, an older Bible perhaps, or taken from records. Some of the records we already have, although some of them may be exclusive to her Bible as many Maine vital records have been lost.
Julia was born Nov. 4, 1857 in Freeport, Maine. She married Wilbur Allen or Allan (misspelled “Allar” in some records) on June 6, 1896 in most likely her hometown of Freeport, Maine although the marriage was also recorded in nearby Portsmouth, New Hampshire.Freeport is a southern Maine coastal town, probably most famous today for being the home of the L.L. Bean store.
She was 39-years-old when she married and subsequent censuses show no children. We would like to find the nearest living relative of Julia, probably a descendant of one of her nieces or nephews to perhaps reunite them with the Bible. The antique store, owned by Lynn Holmes’ grandparents, was located in Leeds, Maine.
Julia’s siblings were: Mary A., Benjamin W., Augustine W., and Edward H.
If these names ring a bell let me know. I will be working on the transcription of the Bible records.

IRVING W.CHANDLER AND WILLIAM L. CHANDLER, “WELLER” CHANDLER

When it rains it pours. After fruitlessly chasing after so many Chandlers who did not lead back to Edmund, I got two within a couple of months. First, there was finding Julia’s family and then tracing the family of Irving Chandler.
I am on the CFA Genealogy Panel which means that this is where the Chandler brick wall questions go. Queries come in from Chandlers all over the world. Occasionally, I get sent inquiries with a New England and possible Edmund connection.
This time it was Irving W. Chandler, who was born in New York c. 1866. Irving turned out to be the first Edmund Chandler descendant to be born in New York that I have come across. An earlier Edmund Chandler descendant family lived in New York for a while then he and most of his family returned to their home state.
According to the 1870 and 1880 US census Irving was a resident of Ellenburg, Clinton, New York. Clinton County borders Vermont. His father, George, married in Colchester, Vermont, but was born in New Hampshire. Irving worked in the textile industry and ended up living in Methuen, Massachusetts.
Misspellings, frequent moves and apparent early death of George made this family difficult to trace. Irving’s mother was, ”Victoria Robertoh”, “Victra Robardo,” “Victoria Roberts”, and “Victorine Robertold”, possibly Victoria Doe, and finally “Anna” according to various records. I am still not sure about the spelling of her last name. With such a wide variation of names, Familysearch did not pick them up as the same person.
Continuing with the wild spelling I came across “Weller” Chandler recorded as George’s father and Irving’s grandfather. Both Dick and I searched for clues as to who this “Weller” was. Dick found a Weller marrying a Chandler in northern Vermont. I found a Wheeler Chandler, who was also an Edmund descendant, but he was not “Weller”.
The clue that solved the puzzle was where George came from. It was Bartlett, New Hampshire and there was a George of the right age whose father was William L. Chandler in the 1850 and 1860 censuses which we figured somehow had mutated into “Weller” in other records. I didn’t have the original records, only transcripts, so we don’t know if it was bad handwriting, bad spelling or bad transcribing or a combination there of which created “Weller.”
Here is Irving’s lineage starting with Irving:
Irving Chandler> George W. Chandler+Victoria Robertoh> William L. Chandler+Betsey Harriman>Jonathan A. Chandler, Jr.+Ruth Stevens> Capt. Jonathan Chandler+Sarah Pierce> Joseph Chandler+Deborah Bonney> Benjamin Chandler+Elizabeth Buck> Edmund Chandler, the immigrant+?
A more complete account with source links will be in the Genealogy Panel report.
There are a couple of Edmund chapter members who descend from William L. Chandler. Have any of you ever heard of him called “Weller?”
Here is a link to the Bartlett Historical Society which may be helpful:http://www.bartletthistory.org/bartletthistory/collections.html

DNA NEWS

DNA

Another two men who took the YDNA test as part of the Chandler DNA project have found matches with the Edmund Chandler family.
The first testee descends from Edmund’s son, Joseph, through his son also named Joseph and his son Philip. Philip stayed in Duxbury and did not migrate to Maine as did his parents and some of his siblings.
The second testee descends from Edmund Chandler through his son Benjamin and his son Joseph. This Joseph Chandler and family migrated from Duxbury to Connecticut with descendants ending up in Piermont, NH.
Hopefully, a third Edmund descendant is in the works for taking the YDNA test soon.
We still have a standing free offer for a Zebedee Chandler of Plympton, Mass (born c. 1711) descendant to take the test as a match would confirm that this Zebedee did descend from Edmund Chandler.
We are also in the hunt for a descendant of Capt. William Chandler originally of Deptford, Kent, England and later of Portsmouth, New Hampshire to test.
Of course, the hunt still continues in England for testees who would match the Edmund Chandler family.
Also, we at the Chandler DNA project had a big surprise, or shock was more like it, when we got the results back from a descendant of another early New England Chandler family (not Edmund) that matched a southern Chandler family. We are still working on that one. Dick will have a story about it in an upcoming issue of the CFA newsletter.
There are several DNA tests now on the market, YDNA, mitochondrial DNA and autosomal DNA. There is a new YDNA test called “Big Y”, but it is expensive and not for surname projects such as our Chandler YDNA project. “Big Y” is for research that goes much farther back than surnames. YDNA testing has proven to be an excellent way to break down brick walls as the testee either matches members of that family or not. It follows the male line only, which in our culture follows the surname, unless there was an unofficial adoption, name change or event outside the marriage.
The mitochondrial test is for the female line and is only in the beginning stages. Not that many have taken this test as opposed to the YDNA test, so not a lot to compare to. It is much more difficult to trace the female line because the surnames change every generation, although the mitochondrial DNA does not.
Lastly there is the autosomal test which is becoming very popular although it is still in the beginning stage as it tests both the male and female side. It sounds great, but you can end up spending a lot of money and not really find out anything useful, especially if you are searching for ancestors who are farther back than fourth cousins. Once you get to fourth or fifth cousins and even often with them, you can get so many hits it can become meaningless.
The autosomal test is more of a cousin finder and loosely an ethnic origin finder. Children inherit half of their genes from one parent and half from the other parent. It is like reaching into a jar and grabbing a handful of colored marbles (genes) from father and then reaching into another jar and grabbing a handful of colored marbles (genes) from mother. Each jar is filled with different colored marbles (genes) inherited from their parents, grandparents and so on. As it is random we don’t get equal amounts of genes from our grandparents, their parents and so on.
Siblings have close, but not identical DNA. Only identical twins have identical DNA. One sibling might inherit that “light cerulean blue colored marble” (gene) from gggg-grandfather and the other sibling might not inherit that “marble” or may not even inherit any colored “marbles” (genes) from gggg-grandfather.
Although autosomal testing can be very helpful in the right situation as in looking for fairly close relatives, it can also get very expensive if you decide to start testing not only yourself, but siblings and cousins trying to track down an elusive farther back ancestor. It could still end up for naught.
Again that is why YDNA testing is so helpful to genealogists because the male “Y” chromosome is inherited almost unchanged through the generations. Generally you only have to pay for one test. There is no random inheritance of the “Y” chromosome (genes are in the chromosomes). The father will pass it to his son and to his son and so forth.
I took the plunge and took the autosomal test as I had very little information about my Polish grandfather and I wasn’t completely certain about that. I was looking for close relatives not distant ones. It was helpful in that it correctly identified my second cousin although we already had made contact thorough traditional genealogy research.
I did find out that I tested nearly half eastern European with maybe a dab of Finnish/Western Russian which fit into what I thought. No dab of Yakut Siberian reindeer herder for me like my Danish side cousin so no packing my bags for a genealogical excursion to Siberia!
You can’t take the ethnicity part of the test as an exact science as few populations are very “pure.” It can offer clues and can also create confusion with mistakes, but it is kind of fun. People who identify as English often show a lot of Scandinavian or Western European. Those Vikings sure got around!

CFA NEWS

In September, the 25th Anniversary celebration and annual meeting will be held in Louisville, Kentucky which will include a river boat cruise. There will also be announcements on what the chapters are doing. I will be sending a summary of what has been going on with Edmund Chandler research.
As the CFA is a big, worldwide group, there is a lot of business to take care of regularly. Sometimes small — key chains, no, and sometimes very big – a trip to England, yes! I have been only on the periphery of some of the Chandler administrative and organizational tasks, like the trip to England, but have been involved with others such as the Genealogy Panel and Chandler DNA project.
If you are interested in Chandler emblazoned pens, t-shirts or a nice tote bag click here: Chandler Family Association – CFA Merchandise

If you are a paid member, you probably got the brochure on the trip to England. There is now a waiting list. It will not be an ordinary tourist outing as it is being custom tailored, by both Chandlers here and Chandlers in England with several surprises planned. The tour will hit popular tourist sites as well as specific Chandler such as Wiltshire. Wiltshire is the ancestral home of genetic Group 7 which includes descendants of John Chandler of 1610 Jamestown and George and Jane Chandler of Pennsylvania/Delaware.
Boy, did I wish we knew where in England Edmund came from so that Edmund’s birthplace could have been included on the tour. We are still working on Edmund’s English origins and hopefully, someday Edmund descendants can visit where he came from.

TIPS AND USEFUL LINKS: Chronicling America « Library of Congress

The above came from our member, Bob. It is the Library of Congress digitized newspaper collection. Click on this link to go to the collection: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/newspapers/

Southern California Genealogical Society: Official Web Site
A reminder, if you want inexpensive home computer access to library editions of Fold3, World Vital Records, My Heritage, and webinars you can join the SCGS for $35.00 per year, link above. All of these resources are available online at your home so you don’t need to live in Southern California to benefit. They are also subject to change. You also may be able to get discounts on DNA testing.

If you do live in Southern California, they have a large library, special interest groups, field trips, “lunch and learn” and put on the second largest genealogy convention in the country, the Jamboree available. A couple of their current projects include creating a facsimile of the 1890 census for Los Angeles, California and raising funds for digitizing pension records for the War of 1812.

COMING UP

The Revolutionary War series got put on the back burner while settling into the CFA and researching other Edmund descendants. I hope to work a little more on Edmund’s origins with help and eventually I will get back to the Revolutionary War.
Until next time, happy ancestor hunting!
Carol

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